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Jul. 10th, 2019

Storm of Locusts (The Sixth World, #2)Storm of Locusts by Rebecca Roanhorse

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


The second book in the Sixth World series picks up just four weeks after the climax of Trail of Lightning and finds Kai missing, apparently under the sway of the White Locust, who is stockpiling explosives. Like the first book, this one is well-paced with good action and adds to the world-building of the world after the Big Water. Even though this just came out, I can't wait for the next one. Recommended.



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2 excellent books of poetry

Compass RoseCompass Rose by Arthur Sze

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


A jarring, often unsettling work of poetry in which the poems often incorporate various perspectives, landscapes, and ideas. In many ways, the poems embody the fullness of life in all its varieties. Highly recommended.



Swift: New and Selected PoemsSwift: New and Selected Poems by David Baker

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


A career-spanning collection by a lesser known poetry who writes stunningly about whatever he focuses on. The poems are lyrical and full of beautiful natural imagery, often from his home in the Midwest. A wonderful introduction to an underappreciated poet.



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The Green Lantern Vol. 1: Intergalactic LawmanThe Green Lantern Vol. 1: Intergalactic Lawman by Grant Morrison

My rating: 3 of 5 stars


Grant Morrison's latest take on Green Lantern is full of his trademark creativity, but the final result falls flat. The tone changes from epic reboot to campy melodrama (moments reminded me of Flash Gordon and not in the good way) to generic law and order story. Weird with some good moments, but disappointing.

[I received an advanced e-galley through Netgalley. The book is due to be released July 16, 2019.]



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Soft ScienceSoft Science by Franny Choi

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


Choi's poetry exists at the intersection of politics, sexuality, and identity, particularly through the lens of the "cyborg" Turing testing itself and asking questions which relate to its and human senses of self. Often the poems are jarring, sometimes brimming with violence or sex or the potential for either. This is ambitious, challenging poetry on the edge of contemporary culture. Recommended.



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Walking: One Step at a TimeWalking: One Step at a Time by Erling Kagge

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


The Norwegian explorer who walked to the South Pole alone writes about one of the most basic human activities. A beautiful little philosophical book, mixed with personal anecdotes and reflections.



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Reading QuirksReading Quirks by The Wild Detectives

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


A fun collection of comics that will appeal to people who prefer reading to most other activities, created by bookstore The Wild Detectives. Ben Fountain writes a fun, brief introduction.

[I received an advanced e-galley of this book through Edelweiss. It is due to be published October 8, 2019.]



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SalvagedSalvaged by Madeleine Roux

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


Rosalyn works as a salvager, a space janitor cleaning up ships that have run into problems on expeditions. She's taken the job as an escape from several bad situations, but soon runs into a worse one. The Brigantine, a ship with no life signs, reports life signs when the crew arrives and a horrifying fate has taken the crew and, if it escapes, the whole of humankind. A well-paced horror adventure story in space with some good twists.

[I received an advanced e-galley through Netgalley. The book is due to be published August 15, 2019.]



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Hope Never Dies (Obama Biden Mysteries, #1)Hope Never Dies by Andrew Shaffer

My rating: 3 of 5 stars


The setup of the former pres and veep as bromantic detectives is obviously one ripe for a good story and the best moments of this book are the repartee between the characters. The mystery itself is not very good or interesting with way too many coincidences and contrivances. I did enjoy it despite myself because of the characters and hope the next story is stronger.



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We're all doomed

Everything Is Going to Kill Everybody: The Terrifyingly Real Ways the World Wants You DeadEverything Is Going to Kill Everybody: The Terrifyingly Real Ways the World Wants You Dead by Robert Brockway

My rating: 3 of 5 stars


Late in this book, while describing the possibility of robots killing us all, the author describes this as "a book about intense fearmongering and creative swearing." Brockway discusses the multiple ways the apocalypse could happen from bio- or nanotechnology to natural disasters, along with a couple of overlooked historical moments when it could have already happened. The book is well-researched and written with a comic tone, but some of its references are a bit dated now and sometimes the humor is a little off target. Still a bit of fun.



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